Tag: reading

  • Long Reads and the Stockholm Syndrome

    Since reading one of the¬†longest novels¬†I have shied away from other lengthy tomes despite thoroughly enjoying my 1000-page adventure. When considering this choice, I frame my decision as defending against a type of literary¬†post-purchase rationalisation: after investing such an enormous amount of time in reading a book, will I be able to objectively consider both…

  • How to Internet: Reading

    One of the first problems you’re likely to run across as someone who’s now finding lots of interesting things on the internet is that you’re amassing more stuff you want to read than you’ve ever had before and it’s getting hard to track. If you’re like I was for about five years, this will likely…

  • How We Read

    What we know about how we learn to read and how our ability to read developed is fascinating, and in a review of a book that looks at exactly this ‚ÄĒ Stanislas Dehaene’s¬†Reading in the Brain ‚ÄĒ Jonah Lehrer offers us a wonderful teaser on exactly that:¬†the hows of reading,¬†from a neuroscience perspective. The introduction:…

  • Hypertext Comprehension and Delinkification

    Deciding whether to click on links while reading material in hypertext form gives rise to an additional cognitive load and additional distractions, goes a theory championed by Steve Gillmor and Nicholas Carr. In certain circumstances this is an argument for the “delinkification” of text, they suggest, as this will hopefully bring about increased comprehension. While…

  • Ways of Reading, Writing, Learning

    A Working Library’s Ways of Reading could be called¬†the nine rules of reading, writing, and learning. My favourite three: Always read with a pen in hand. The pen should be used both to mark the text you want to remember and to write from where the text leaves you. Think of the text as the…

  • A Guide to Speed Reading

    The PX Project is a single 3-hour “cognitive experiment” designed to increase your reading speed. Average increases using the technique are apparently in the region of 386%. The technique seems to involve three steps: Minimize the number and duration of fixations per line. Eliminate regression and back-skipping. Use conditioning drills to increase horizontal peripheral vision…